BOOKS

“Magnificent in its tumultuous yet savvy voicings, its pain transformed into cadence, its personal yet generous stagings of self.”

—Rosanna Warren, author of Ghost in a Red Hat

Good Boys is a firecracker book full of sharp, imaginative, heart-full poems about tarot, running in the suburbs, goats, cities, nuclear fallout, and bigger things like identity, family, race, and feminism. If Broad City and Carmen Maria Machado had a poetry baby, it would be Good Boys.”

BOMB Magazine

Good Boys speaks to our shared knowledge that things cannot go on as they are and yet, day by day, we are going on. Fernandes explores what it feels like to live a life organized by risk, the ordinary wagers and debts we make in our attachments to the people, places, and ideas that we love, our promises to ourselves and others: “The way we bet. What we gamble with.” Being good is one way of managing risk. But it also allows us to ignore the ways in which our world is built on theft — the piracies of whiteness, a sense of entitlement to someone else’s body or someone else’s country… The poems demonstrate an intelligent handling of form, disrupting convenient distinctions between the neatness of intellect and the chaos of feeling.”

– Los Angeles Review of Books

“Fernandes’s debut collection, The Kingdom and After (Tightrope Books, 2015), introduced us to her voice as both blunt truth-teller and measured verse-architect. In Good Boys, her new collection published last month from Tin House Books, she plunges back into family, relationships, and identity—then explores the lens itself through which she sees and thinks about her world. Her anger and agitation speak so clearly, so compellingly, that we find ourselves reading her poems on the edge of unease: What will happen next? Is this going to hurt? Will she soothe us?

And she does, with great care and love.”

-The Rumpus

“This tremendous collection of poems centers feminism, racism, and rage in all its imperfections, contradictions and candor.”

– Ms Magazine

“If there is no ethical consumption under late capitalism, our job is to figure out how to move through this world while causing it the least harm. ‘I like when the choices are both ugly,’ Megan Fernandes writes in Good Boys, and then she shows us: rocks and hard places, guns and snowbanks, there and here. It’s a staggering text—ferocious, vulnerable, funny, ambitious, and deeply rigorous. What can a poet do for people, for a planet, literally dying of human greed? Fernandes answers: ‘I map / the storms // of the whole world.’”

—Kaveh Akbar, author of Calling a Wolf a Wolf

“What I learned from you is how/not to be a body,’ Megan Fernandes asserts in her evocatively beautiful collection Good Boys, musing in a later poem, ‘How some of us laugh while hunted.’ These are poems of haunting and hunting, of bodies that are remade in different cities, of family and its legacy, of immigration and what it takes from us. The collection traverses time and place, meditating on the ways love shatters and recreates us all, particularly when it intersects with being othered. Fernandes writes compellingly of the dislocation that comes with migration: ‘My daddy is not a thing like your daddy,’ she says. ‘Our house was not a thing like your house.’ Alike or not, this house of poems contains tremendous light.’”

—Hala Alyan, author of The Twenty-Ninth Year

“The poetry of Megan Fernandes gives me courage to get up another day and fight the patriarchy & racist nationalism. Her limitless imagination and beautiful, lyrical, powerful lines are worth fighting for.  Everyone should give this book to someone they love, and everyone should love someone enough to give them this book.”

—Brenda Shaughnessy, author of The Octopus Museum

THE KINGDOM AND AFTER (2015)

THE KINGDOM AND AFTER (Debut Collection)

STRANGERS IN PARIS (Edited Collection) 

SOME CITRUS MAKES ME BLUE (Chapbook)

OTHERS WILL ENTER THE GATES: IMMIGRANT POETS ON POETRY, INFLUENCES, and WRITING IN AMERICA (Essay in Anthology) 

BEHIND THE STARS, MORE STARS: THE TAGUS / DISQUIET COLLECTION OF NEW LUSO-AMERICAN WRITING (Essay in Anthology)

Praise for The Kingdom and After:

‘Am I accountable for these histories?’ writes Megan Fernandes in her memorable poem ‘Archives.’ Yes and no—her fresh, embracing imagination attends to several continents, many languages and cultures, with the originality of one who looks at a piano from below, seeing the ‘woody spirit of the instrument,’ its cavern and brackets, attentive to the sound of ‘the chimptas, fire gongs with bells’ and ‘the swampy Goa.’ (‘The Piano and the Ivy.’ ) A book of pleasures, wild inventions and profound clarity.”

—Robert Pinsky, Poet Laureate of the United States (1997-2000)

“In these limpid poems, Megan Fernandes finds her way back to roots and origins, even as she charts our many topographical, dreamed, amatory, and atomic detours. ‘Touch everything,’ she entreats, ‘Tell me about the broken terrain.’ It is the poem’s job to graph and weave from here to there and back again, and this she does, returning with much-needed news of our follies and fortunes.”

—Eleni Sikelianos, author of Body Clock and The California Poem

“Megan Fernandes’ poems sizzle with imagination and wordplay. Crab nebula, astroid octopi, wild orchids, Baudelaire and Faulkner, “measles, beetles, and boxed apple juice”—there’s nothing her poems can’t celebrate and combine in spicy variations. But at their core, Fernandes places elemental nourishment. In dazzle and darkness, in frolic and sober assessment, these poems craft shapes that matter.”

–Rosanna Warren, Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets (1999-2005)

CHAPBOOKS and ANTHOLOGIES

Some Citrus Makes me Blue is a chapbook published by Dancing Girl Press in January 2012. It was launched in Chicago. Some Citrus Makes me Blue was also briefly mentioned in The Best American Poetry Blog and on the October 2014 recommended reading list at the Poetry Foundation. You can find a copy here: http://dulcetshop.myshopify.com/products/some-citrus-makes-me-blue-megan-fernandes

Praise for Some Citrus Makes me Blue:

“From Megan Fernandes you can learn that language has an energy of its own, much like the (Kinetics) of a pink leaf, running somehow parallel to us, able sometimes to be spooned up & turned over, like the air, or different coloured light, in the hands of only the very carefulest listeners and observers—like Fernandes. You can learn how adjectives are palpable as meat and why young women cheat and about pennies from Yeats’ poems. You can learn what queens do with little boys behind blue-rutted buses; about dinosaurs & neurons and the catastrophe of gestures. You can learn about the soft anger of the poet & certain other overlooked corners of the brain; about movement & food stuffs & ontologies & joy. She can teach you all this.”

-Emily Critchley, University of Greenwich 

“Neurons, synapses, matter, planets and energy describe memories and their relation to the present tense. ‘The sounds grows.’ Imagine a poetry that anthropomorphises cellular process, that excavates the operations beneath ontology, which is philosophy, which is a body in motion, sense organs all open: this is that. Organ Speech is provocative, lyrical, suspenseful, exciting, sexy, and full of ideas. TOUCH EVERYTHING.”

-Marianne Morris

STRANGERS IN PARIS (Edited Collection)

OTHERS WILL ENTER THE GATES: IMMIGRANT POETS ON POETRY, INFLUENCES, and WRITING IN AMERICA (Essay in Anthology) 

BEHIND THE STARS, MORE STARS: THE TAGUS / DISQUIET COLLECTION OF NEW LUSO-AMERICAN WRITING (Essay in Anthology)